The motive behind Madaari is to ask questions: Irrfan Khan

Madaari is Irrfan Khan’s “passion project”, his way of asking uncomfortable questions about accountability in India. Here, the actor speaks about issues others are too afraid to say out aloud. In Madaari, your character seeks redress when he loses his family in a metro bridge collapse in Mumbai. What was the trigger for this story? Some friends were sitting together and discussing a few real-life incidents. Then, we started talking about accountability — how our system does not demand accountability. If a person is in a position to take decisions that affect people’s lives and, if those decisions have negative repercussions a few years later, the official is transferred from one post to another. So, who is to be held accountable for it? It took a year to develop a story about this because we had to keep in mind that the audience is also to be entertained and engaged. Can we call this a passion project? Every film is a passion project. Sometimes you do a film where the film or the atmosphere does not let you really dig deep. Doing a film with the mindset that it is a job would be a torture. It has to deal with your inner being. What was the motive behind taking up such a subject? To raise questions. The intention was also to ask questions, such as ‘where would a common man go when something goes wrong, even though there are various departments?’ Our judiciary is so overloaded. There are many instances of our sticking to the laws that were made decades ago. As a country, we have to ask questions collectively to bring change. Sometimes, you have a story that you wish to reflect on through cinema although you are not an activist.
Category: 
Rating : 
No votes yet
Story Type: 
Article

The motive behind Madaari is to ask questions: Irrfan Khan 0

04 July 2016Submitted by Author

Madaari is Irrfan Khan’s “passion project”, his way of asking uncomfortable questions about accountability in India. Here, the actor speaks about issues others are too afraid to say out aloud. In Madaari, your character seeks redress when he loses his family in a metro bridge collapse in Mumbai. What was the trigger for this story? Some friends were sitting together and discussing a few real-life incidents. Then, we started talking about accountability — how our system does not demand accountability. If a person is in a position to take decisions that affect people’s lives and, if those decisions have negative repercussions a few years later, the official is transferred from one post to another. So, who is to be held accountable for it? It took a year to develop a story about this because we had to keep in mind that the audience is also to be entertained and engaged. Can we call this a passion project? Every film is a passion project. Sometimes you do a film where the film or the atmosphere does not let you really dig deep. Doing a film with the mindset that it is a job would be a torture. It has to deal with your inner being. What was the motive behind taking up such a subject? To raise questions. The intention was also to ask questions, such as ‘where would a common man go when something goes wrong, even though there are various departments?’ Our judiciary is so overloaded. There are many instances of our sticking to the laws that were made decades ago. As a country, we have to ask questions collectively to bring change. Sometimes, you have a story that you wish to reflect on through cinema although you are not an activist.

Click here to post comments

Or log in with...